John Berthiaume Milo Ikebana Vase 1″H x 10.25″L x 7″W

$120.00

In stock

Description

John Berthiaume Milo Ikebana Vase 1″H x 10.25″L x 7″W

John Berthiaume

 

About the Artist

John Berthiaume is a woodworker who moved to Hawai’i from his home state of Michigan in 1978. While taking advantage of the many beautiful types of wood available in Hawai’i, he has developed his passion and talent for woodworking. He specializes in designing and crafting jewelry boxes, bowls and furniture from locally sourced wood.

 Milo

From Canoe Plants of Ancient Hawaii, written by Lynton Dove White:
“There are those who say that the beautifully grained milo wood utensils, furnishings and jewelry were only for the chiefs of ancient Hawai’i. It is told that the Waikiki home of Kamehameha I was surrounded by milo trees.

Although rare today, in old Hawai’i milo was a commonly found tree, cultivated as a shade plant around homes near sunny coastal areas with loose soil. It does not grow in the high inland forests.

Brought to these islands by early Polynesian settlers who carried the seeds, this fast-growing evergreen tree was planted around the temples in Tahiti, as it was said to be spiritually connected to the chant and to prayer. It is a widespread species throughout Polynesia and Micronesia, as well as in tropical Africa.

The bark of milo was used for cordage fiber, similarly to hau, but it is inferior in quality to hau and to olona. The tree also yields tannin, dye, oil, medicine and gum, from various parts of the plant. Milo wood is flavorless, since it is lacking in any unpleasant-tasting sap that could contaminate stored food.

The milo tree is a small to medium-sized one, growing to less than 40 feet high. The trunk can be 2 feet in diameter at full maturity. The bark is corrugated, with scaly twigs. The branches are widely spread and usually horizontal, making for an ideal shade tree.

Milo wood has an attractive grain that takes to a high polish and, in addition to food utensils and containers, was fashioned into paddles and other carved objects, as well as for an occasional canoe, although koa was considered to be the most popular material for canoes”.

The dimensions listed in the ‘additional information’ table includes packing for shipment.  The dimension listed on this page is correct for the bowl itself.  Mahalo!

John Berthiaume Milo Ikebana Vase 1″H x 10.25″L x 7″W

Additional information

Weight 7.8 lbs
Dimensions 7 × 16.25 × 13 in

Honolulu, Hawaii (808) 596-0074