Gordon Tang Osage Orange ‘Umeke with Koa Pewas 4″H x 3″D

$295.00

In stock

Description

Gordon Tang Osage Orange ‘Umeke with Koa Pewas 4″H x 3″D

"Congratulations

 

Gordon Tang’s traditional Hawaiian shapes are widely appreciated by collectors of Hawaiiana both for functional and decorative purposes. A number of people collect his bowls for poi supper, luckies!

‘Umeke

‘Umeke ‘ai is an honored implement in a Hawai’i home, for through the ceremony of eating poi one at a time from the bowl at the center. The ‘umeke ‘ai filled with kalo (taro) is considered the means of survival of the people of Hawai`i Nei.

‘Umeke la’au is the Hawai’i name for these containers or calabashes of wood, which were used for the storage, transport and serving of food in various stages of preparation.

 

Further information about Koa:

Uses
Ancient Hawaiians were using the koa trunks to build waʻa (dugout outrigger canoes) and papa heʻe nalu (surfboards).  The reddish wood is very similar in strength and weight to that of Black Walnut (Juglans nigra). Because of its specific gravity of 0.55, Koa is sought for use in wood carving and furniture. Koa is also a tonewood. It is often used in the construction of ukuleles, acoustic guitars, and Weissenborn-style Hawaiian steel guitars.

Conservation
The koa population has suffered from grazing and logging.  The largest koa grow in wet forest areas. Many of those have been logged out, though. Koa now comes largely from dead or dying trees or farms on private lands. Although formerly used for outrigger canoes, there are few koa remaining, large and straight enough to do so today. In areas where cattle are present, the koa regeneration is almost completely suppressed. However, if the cattle are removed, koa are among the few native Hawaiian plants able to germinate in grassland. It can be instrumental in restoring native forest.

Osage Orange

Uses

Osage orange has a long and interesting history of use by both Native Americans and early pioneers. Its wood was once in demand for making hubs and wheel rims for horse drawn wagons, mine support timbers, posts and many other uses where decay resistance was important. Osage orange was first cultivated in the south in the early 1800’s. It was brought north by Professor Jonathan Turner, a biology teacher at Illinois College, and promoted as a living fence by John Wright, editor of The Prairie Farmer. By 1847 Turner was convinced that Osage orange was the best fencing material available. He described it as “horse high, bull strong and pig tight” and it functioned as a “hedge” fence long before the invention of barbed wire. By the 1850’s Osage orange hedges made the fencing of entire farms possible. The French found the Osage Indians making bows from the wood and called it Bois d’Arc (meaning wood of the bow). Recently, Osage orange has been studied for the chemical properties it contains that may be of economic importance.

The dimensions listed in the ‘additional information’ tab includes packing for shipment.

Mahalo!

Gordon Tang Osage Orange ‘Umeke with Koa Pewas 4″H x 3″D

Additional information

Weight 4.3 lbs
Dimensions 10 × 9 × 9 in

Honolulu, Hawaii (808) 596-0074